Brits have officially eaten all the pies – and its because of the cold weather

Brits are eating pies to help them cope with winter’s first chill. As ten million of the pastry treats are being gobbled a week as comfort food sales boom, retail data shows.

Pukka Pies is churning out 200,000 daily for supermarkets and chippies – a rise of 20% on last year. The firm said: “Our pies are popular across the nation.”

Brits often turn to favourites such as beef and ale and chicken and mushroom to warm up in bone-chilling weather. Retail analysts Strutt & Parker said: “Hearty food does well during colder periods.”

And Hollands Pies said: “Sales increased in lockdown – and the resurgence is continuing.”

It comes as the nation’s two biggest forecasters predicted polar opposites for this winter.

The Government-run Met Office has forecast mild weather while the BBC – which gets its information from DTN – warned of a deep freeze.

John Hammond, a former weatherman at both, said: “They are starkly different forecasts and can’t both be right.”

It comes as the nation’s two biggest forecasters predicted polar opposites for this winter.

For the latest weather updates and breaking news stories from the UK and across the globe, sign up for our newsletter by clicking here.

The Government-run Met Office has forecast a mild few months ahead but the BBC, which gets its information from DTN, warned of a deep freeze.

John Hammond, a former weatherman at both the BBC and Met Office, said: “It’s meteorological mayhem with huge disagreement on what happens in the months ahead. They are starkly different forecasts and can’t both be right.

“There are huge implications for customers such as Government, the energy sector, media and a wide range of other industries.

“Back-pedalling will be required by one of the big boys. Who will blink first?”

The Met Office says: “A mild three-month period is more likely than a cold one.”

But the BBC’s forecaster DTN says: “This winter is likely to feature a weak polar vortex, bringing increased cold risks from Arctic air masses later in the season. January and February could feature frigid air, similar to last year.”

Source: Read Full Article